Hemmingson: One Entrepreneur and One Radical Socialist

Once in the new land of opportunity, many ancestral parents could barely afford their family an elementary level education, yet saw a child attain distinction. Great grandfather, Ole Hemmingson (1851-1903), headed a family like that.1, 2   He produced two such children. Same father, different mothers. Matt Hemmingsen (1876-1967) was told “your mother has died, so … Continue reading Hemmingson: One Entrepreneur and One Radical Socialist

Dear Granddad: If Only November Had Been August

Emigrations were game changers, but some were more impactful than others. Our grandfather’s collision with America is a recent revision to his ancestry. He was Mathias Hemmingsen.                                RECAP: Dad wrote that his grandfather, Ole Hemmingson, pictured in the thumbnail below, … Continue reading Dear Granddad: If Only November Had Been August

Our Anecdotal Jewishness

Dad did a family history with intent to cover his, and our mother’s ancestry.1 He wrote mostly of his memories, but hired professional genealogists to document what came before. They outright failed his father-in-law on our Scots side, understandably, for the reason that made him subject of “Double Genealogy: The Adoption Witness”.2 They equally failed … Continue reading Our Anecdotal Jewishness

Alexander Ancestry; the Great Wall of Margaret

Here are four generations behind Margaret Naysmith Hemmingsen, born Alexander (1891-1979). She was our Granny, and her own stories appear in our "Memories" section.  This chapter will close on one whose joys were stabbed by misery, who, nonetheless, conducted a memorable well-led life.  This embraces 1760 Ireland and Scotland to 1911 Canada. Granny’s generation was … Continue reading Alexander Ancestry; the Great Wall of Margaret

From the logging camps (4)

This completes the discussion about PG 1 of Pop’s scrapbook that was featured prior (in larger print) , in “From the Logging Camps (3)”. 1 Pop wrote that our residence in the early 1940s at Camp 2, Port Renfrew, BC, was 10 miles up the railway that began at the mouth of the San Juan … Continue reading From the logging camps (4)