Memoirs of Matt Hemmingsen (1876-1967): His Postcard – 1911

PREVIEW We have told the story of Matt's years around 1911 twice: once as he made innovations in West Coast logging and again through an oil painting on maple burl that depicted his unique logging operation. This recently received postcard tells his 1911 tale through a deeply personal lens. PREVIOUSLY Past posts took Matt Hemmingsen … Continue reading Memoirs of Matt Hemmingsen (1876-1967): His Postcard – 1911

The Adoption Witness: Rare Postcard to Skog-Vefsn; Revealing What?

This is sixth in a series on Edward Hemmingsen and his wife Anna Tobiassen, or Thompson. See Notes and Source, for details. Sisters! Here is an undated photo-postcard of Johanna Karoline Tobiassen in Minneapolis, with two unnamed Swedish companions. She sent it inside an envelope to some Skog-Vefsn folk such that it is unaddressed and … Continue reading The Adoption Witness: Rare Postcard to Skog-Vefsn; Revealing What?

Matt Hemmingsen (1876-1967) Memoirs: His Innovations in West Coast Logging 1907-1911

Photo © Sean Hemmingsen 2020 Our Tsolum River post featured Matt Hemmingsen using hands-on expertize that he had gained during river drives in Wisconsin, to correct an epic logjam in British Columbia. That was 1907. Our last post enlarged a segment of photo left, to describe a "log trough" system he developed around 1910. It greatly … Continue reading Matt Hemmingsen (1876-1967) Memoirs: His Innovations in West Coast Logging 1907-1911

The Adoption Witness On Ancestry: The Baroness of Skog-Vefsn Emigrates to Lake Cowichan

Here is a copy of an original letter from the Baron of Manby/Baron of Skog-Vefsn; Dr. Lloyd J. Bailey, B.A., M.A., M.Ed. Ph.D. to our father, John O. Hemmingsen, dated 11 Feb 2000.1 Now, even original materials must be offered with caution; some may contain a little farce. That is, while it is far from … Continue reading The Adoption Witness On Ancestry: The Baroness of Skog-Vefsn Emigrates to Lake Cowichan

From the logging camps (6)

"Port Renfrew 50 Years Later" completes the scrapbook made for me, by my father, John Oliver Hemmingsen. He called it "Forest Regeneration".1 Previous posts covered much of the book. This part accounts for a trip Dad made to the area with Uncle Bob, with my older brother John, in 1990.  For some time by then, there … Continue reading From the logging camps (6)